Publications

Mercer E., Sherfey E., Ogbu C., & Riley E.A. (2022). Effects of CPAP on Language Recovery in Post-Stroke Aphasia: A Review of Recent Literature. Brain Sciences. 12(3), 379. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci12030379

Riley, E.A., Hart, E., Preston, J.L., Wu, Y., and Ashaie, S. (2021). Pervasiveness of speech-language disorders and fatigue in stroke: A systematic scoping review. Journal of Communication Disorders. 93. doi: 10.1016/j.jcomdis.2021.106145

Brookshire, C.E., Kendall, D. & Riley, E.A. (in press). Written language comprehension and acquired reading disorders. In Papathanassiou, Coppens, & Potagas (Eds.), Aphasia and Related Neurogenic Communication Disorders, 3rd Ed. Sudbury, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning, LLC

Riley, E.A. & Owora, A. (2020). Relationship between EEG-measured vigilant attention and behavioral task engagement in persons with chronic aphasia. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research. 63, 1430-1445. doi: 10.1044/2020_JSLHR-19-00016

Wilmskoetter, J., Del Gaizo, J., Phillip, L., Behroozmand, R., Gleichgerrcht, E., Fridriksson, J., Riley, E.A., & Bonilha, L. (2019). Predicting naming responses based on pre-articulatory electrical activity in individuals with aphasia. Clinical Neurophysiology. 130, 2153-2163. doi: 10.1016/j.clinph.2019.08.011

Riley, E.A. & Wu, Y. (2019). Artificial grammar learning with transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS): A pilot study. Brain Stimulation, 12(5), 1307-1308. doi: 10.1016/j.brs.2019.07.002

Riley, E.A., Owora, A., McCleary, J., & Anderson, A. (2019). Daytime sleepiness, exertion fatigue, arousal, and task vigilance in persons with chronic aphasia. American Journal of Speech Language Pathology, 28, 1491-1508. doi: 10.1044/2019_AJSLP-18-0301

Riley, E.A., Barbieri, E., Weintraub, S., Mesulam, M.M, & Thompson, C.K. (2018). Semantic typicality effects in Primary Progressive Aphasia. American Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Dementias, 33(5), 292–300. doi: 10.1177/1533317518762443

Riley, E.A., Brookshire Madden, C.E.& Kendall, D.L.(2018). Acquired alexias: Mechanisms of reading. In Raymer, A.M. & Gonzalez-Rothi, L.J. (Eds.), Oxford Handbook of Aphasia and Language Disorders. New York: Oxford University Press.

Riley, E.A. (2017). Patient fatigue in aphasia treatment: A survey of speech-language pathologists. Communication Disorders Quarterly, 38(3), 143-153. doi:10.1177/1525740116656330

Riley, E.A. & McFarland, D.J. (2017). EEG error prediction as a solution for combining the advantages of retrieval practice and errorless learning. Front. Hum. Neurosci. 11,140. doi:10.3389/fnhum.2017.00140

Riley, E.A., Brookshire, C.E., & Kendall, D.L. (2016). The acquired disorders of reading. In Papathanassiou, Coppens, & Potagas (Eds.), Aphasia and Related Neurogenic Communication Disorders, 2nd Ed. Sudbury, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning, LLC.

Costell, M. & Riley, E.A. (2015). Intensive therapy for aphasia: What does “intensive” really mean? eHearsay: Electronic Journal of the Ohio Speech-Language Hearing Association, 5(1), 99-109.

Riley, E.A., & Thompson, C.K. (2015). Training pseudoword reading in acquired dyslexia: A phonological complexity approach. Aphasiology, 29(2), 129-150.doi: 10.1080/02687038.2014.955389

Thompson, C.K., Riley, E.A., Den Ouden, D.B., Meltzer-Asscher, A., & Lukic, S. (2013). Training verb argument structure production in agrammatic aphasia: Behavioral and neural recovery patterns. Cortex, 49(9), 2358-2376. doi: 10.1016/j.cortex.2013.02.003

Riley, E.A. & Kendall, D.L. (2011). The acquired disorders of reading. In Papathanassiou, Coppens, & Potagas (Eds.),Aphasia and Related Neurogenic Communication Disorders, 1st Ed. Sudbury, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning, LLC.

Riley, E.A. & Thompson, C.K. (2010). Semantic typicality effects in acquired dyslexia: Evidence for semantic impairment in deep dyslexia. Aphasiology, 24(6-8), 802-813. doi:10.1080/02687030903422486

Riley, E.A. & Thompson, C.K. (2010). Ortho-phonological cueing may be a viable method of treating anomia in Chinese for speakers with alphabetic script knowledge. Evidence-Based Communication Assessment & Intervention, 4(1), 49-53. doi: 10.1080/17489531003722087

RESEARCH GRANTS

Active

· National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIH/NIDCD) R21DC017787-01A1; Improving aphasia outcomes through tDCS-mediated attention management. Awarded 2020.

· Syracuse University Undergraduate Research and Creative Works Grant Program; Vigilant Attention Levels in Persons with Aphasia across Linguistic and Non-Linguistic Tasks. Project funding and academic stipend awarded to undergraduate student, Dannielle Hibshman in 2019.

Completed

· Neuromodulation for Rehabilitation Collaboration Grant, NIH National Center of Neuromodulation for Rehabilitation (NC NM4R); Improving aphasia outcomes through tDCS-mediated attention management: Pilot Study. Awarded 2019.

· Syracuse University Small Equipment Grant Program; Applying Transcranial Electrical Stimulation to Improve Cognition, Language, and Motor Recovery after Stroke. Awarded 2019.

· Syracuse University Neuroscience ILM Summer Research Fellowship Grant; Using tDCS to Improve Attention in Aphasia: A Pilot Study. Summer funding awarded to undergraduate student, Ying Wu in 2018.

· American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation New Investigators Research Grant; EEG Quantification of Vigilance in Aphasia. Awarded 2016.

· Syracuse University Seed Grant Program; Establishing New Research Collaborations to Investigate Neurophysiology in Persons with Aphasia. Awarded 2015.

· Syracuse University Neuroscience ILM Summer Research Fellowship Grant; The Relationship Between EEG-Measured Vigilance and Cognitive Performance in Older Adults. Summer funding awarded to undergraduate student, Jennifer Hylkema in 2015.